Forensic Healthcare Online

On-line continuing education information for forensic healthcare professionals

Archive for the ‘Accidental Injury’ Category

Is It Injury or Neglect?

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The Federal Interagency Workgroup on Child Abuse and Neglect has an archived webinar from August 2008 available for review: Is It Injury or Neglect? Improving Our Knowledge to Better Protect Children. The session discusses “efforts to better define neglect in the context of accidental injury and described models of child death case reviews that will lead to improved understanding, reporting, and prevention strategies.” The presenters represent public health, advocacy and fatality review organizations. A complete transcript of the webinar is also available.

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Written by Jenifer

July 28, 2009 at 9:30 am

Articles of Note: July Edition

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Time once again for a run down of some of the new and noteworthy articles in the current literature. Most of these are from the June/July/August issues. As always, please keep in mind this in no way a comprehensive list; simply items that have caught my attention from a selection of peer-reviewed journals. Most links lead to PubMed abstracts (except for one, which goes to Ingenta); from there you can choose what’s worth a.) paying for; b.) a pilgrimage to your nearest medical library;  or c.) downloading via the full-text access you possibly have at your disposal.

Just a warning: it’s a lengthy list this month. There’s all kinds of good stuff being published right now…

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Pediatric Burns

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Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta has a streaming Grand Rounds webcast available: Burns in Pediatrics–Abuse, Accident or Outlier? It’s available free of charge, but requires registration with the site. Unfortunately, this one is also CMEs only, but is certainly relevant for clinicians across the board. (I’m working on finding some new relevant nursing CEs, but there are a lot less of those, sorry.)

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Written by Jenifer

June 30, 2009 at 9:36 am

Core Competencies In Injury Prevention

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Hooray for bandwidth!!!

I’m back today with at least one post. I’m working on a bigger post, which I may be able to get done by this evening. But I will have been traveling 18 hours by the time I finally get to DC (starting at 4am Venice time), so forgive me if it doesn’t happen. For now, I’m hanging out in the Amsterdam airport and have just enough time before my flight to DC for a quickie. The University of Pittsburgh Department of Neurological Surgery hosted a webinar last summer on moving toward core competencies in injury prevention.

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Written by Jenifer

April 16, 2009 at 3:01 am

Blast Injuries & Mass Casualties

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Since I loaded you with posts yesterday (and according to my stats page A LOT of you are working your way through the cervical images today–wow, people), a nice bite-sized podcast to have with your morning latte. The CDC, always a reliable source for content, has a podcast on Blast Injuries: What Clinicians Need to Know. It clocks in at under 3 minutes–barely enough time to set the speed and incline on your treadmill. However, if this brief audio isn’t enough to satisfy your need for info on the subject…

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Injury Research

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From VAWNet: The CDC has released their Injury Research Agenda for 2009-2018. You can see the full report here (PDF).

Child Death Review

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Child Death Reviews (or Child Fatality Reviews as they’re called in my neck of the woods) are happening in all 50 states and in countries around the world. Talking about child fatalities doesn’t always mean putting lessons learned into practice, though. The University of Pittsburgh, Department of Neurological Surgery’s Center for Injury Research and Control has an archived webinar on this topic: The Role of the Injury Professional on the Child Death Review Team: Translating CDR Findings to Injury Prevention Policy and Practice.

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